Jump to content
  • Added By Twitch Bot ·
  • GingerWizardZZ
    sunday about 4pm / monday 2pm then just some random times i get chance as i work hard in the week
    Welcome to Monstercat FM
    A 24/7 VOD friendly music stream of non stop Monstercat music!
    Monstercat: Call of the Wild
    Tuesday - 1PM PDT / 4PM EDT / 9PM BST
    Join our Interactive Hub for the full experience
  • CeltS TV - Community Streamers

    We are brand new to the Streamer side off things and are looking to build a strong community of like mined Streamers who want to grow. 

    We are looking for gamer's that like to stream spreading positivity and love in the community. What we want to achieve is to grow as a Streaming community for new and old streamers alike improving streams and attitudes one step at a time! 

    We encapsulate a group of streamers of all varieties large and small, who stream a variety of games We also provide a Discord for Streamers to call home and chill We are here so we can show each other support and grow as a Community 

    If you think you would like to help each other grow that would be Awesome 

    Cmty Retweet #celtssupportstreamers

    Twitch Community & Channel

    https://www.twitch.tv/communities/celts_tv [twitch.tv] Give us a Follow 
    https://go.twitch.tv/celts_tv [go.twitch.tv] 

    Streamers united - A community of supportive streamers

    Est. Oct 2017

    CeltS TV - Community Gamers

    We are a Friendly bunch off People that love to Hang out play Games and have fun doing it! We are always looking for new people to join us for a few games.

    We are always willing to help out where we can and make you feel right at home. Pop onto our Discord and say hello,

    We hope to here from you soon     

     We also are well respected Anti Cheat Community in the gaming community, with over 1552 bans of Oct 2017



  • Live Streaming Twitch

    PUBG’s new smaller island map is a direct response to the popularity of Fortnite

    By IrishAceKavo,

    Competition in the battle royale genre is heating up


    If you’ve kept even just a peripheral gaze aimed at the online gaming community over the last six months or so, you’ve likely seen the explosion in popularity of Fortnite Battle Royale. Epic Games’ cartoony and competitive survival shooter game took a core element of Playerunknown’s Battlegrounds — 100 human players parachuting onto an island with an ever-shrinking battlefield — and turned into a worldwide phenomenon. Fortnite clips and highlights have inundated Instagram, Reddit, and Twitter at an alarmingly high rate, helping it permeate mainstream culture in ways few other modern have.

    The popularity of Fortnite may be precisely why the creators of PUBG are working hard on a new, smaller island map for their own PC-focused game, which will debut on its test servers next month. In the announcement yesterday, developer PUBG Corporation explained that the “smaller map will offer faster, more intense matches with higher player density.” One of the core complaints you can make of PUBG in its current state is that its games take quite a long time, and much of that time is spent moving from one place to another without setting your sights on another human player. That’s how the game was originally designed: a realistic military-style shooter in which you had to carefully plan a route, obtain vehicles for faster travel, and avoid or engage in nearby firefights to maximize your chances of victory.

    But Fortnite has completely reoriented what players expect, and how they like to play, games in the burgeoning battle royale genre. Because Fortnite’s single map is smaller, and because characters move faster across it, games are nearly half the duration of standard PUBG matches. And because of Epic’s design decisions over the last few months, which include drastically changing aspects of the map by adding new locations and more loot to find, games have accelerated even faster toward the final 20 or 30 players. It’s in that bracket that action becomes more tense and the most rewarding plays can be made.

    The creators of PUBG know they’re going to have to iterate faster than ever before to keep pace with Fortnite, which has for months featured new and experimental limited time game modes and a dizzying number of new weapons, items, and purchasable cosmetics. Epic Games’ take on a battle royale game is already the most watched game on Twitch and has posted viewer numbers almost double that to PUBG in recent weeks. Popular streamers, like Dr. Disrespect, have also begun experimenting with Fortnite streaming because of its sheer popularity. If PUBG doesn’t make the necessary changes to keep up, its game will remain restricted to the hardcore PC gaming enthusiasts who helped propel it to the forefront of the online scene last year, while Fortnite becomes the vastly more popular mainstream title.

    So it’s clear why the creators of PUBG see a smaller map as an important add-on. A new, more intense environment to compete in will undoubtedly increase the number of highlights making their way to social media, and it will give popular streamers a new battleground to compete in live on Twitch. As part of its 2018 road map, PUBG Corp. also detailed technical improvements and new features it will be adding, including an emote system that is another obvious response to Fortnite.

    While the hardcore PUBG players may bemoan the developer’s attempts at more mainstream appeal, these changes are clearly more a matter of survival than anything else. As Epic illustrated when it lifted core concepts of PUBG back in August and catapulted Fortnite into the mainstream, it doesn’t matter who does it first; it matters who does it best.



    Overwatch fans spend thousands cheering - but the money goes to Twitch and Overwatch League, not teams

    By IrishAceKavo,

    Cheer Leaders.


    Correction: The original headline for this story read "Fans spend thousands cheering Overwatch League teams - but the money goes to Twitch, not teams." In actuality, the revenue from Cheering on Twitch is shared between Twitch and The Overwatch League, although the split is unknown. We've updated the headline to clearly convey that Cheering supports the partnership between OWL and Twitch, not simply Twitch itself. 

    Story follows:

    Since Twitch introduced "Cheering" during Overwatch League streams earlier this week, viewers have cheered over 20 million times. Taking a rough conversion rate of $.014 per bit, that equates to around $280,000/£200,000.

    From February 21, 2018, viewers who have linked their Battle.net accounts to their Twitch, MLG.com or overwatchleague.com accounts can earn in-game currency, League Tokens, by viewing OWL matches. These in turn can be used to purchase Overwatch League team skins. 

    Viewers can also unlock loot by Cheering, too. Cheer on a team with 150+ Bits using a team’s Cheermote, and you’ll receive that team’s exclusive Twitch emote. For every 100 Bits you Cheer, you’ll get one of 26 random Overwatch Hero emotes to use on Twitch, and a promise of "no duplicates" if you want to collect them all. 

    There are also collective milestones to unlock; OWL-skinned Tracer will pop for all eligible viewers when the collective Cheer count hits an eye-watering 40,000,000 bits. 

    The counter on the OWL page now stands at 20,753,559 cheers, with leaderboards offer an insight into who is Cheering the most, and by how much. At the time of writing, Dallas Fuel leads with 3,809,409 team Cheers, while bob7d leads the single leaderboard having clocked up 237,350.

    The money collated via Cheering doesn't go directly to your favourite teams, though.

    "Overwatch League Cheering is part of a larger partnership between Twitch and Overwatch League that supports the League and players as a whole," states Twitch’s FAQ (via Unikrn). "Your Cheering helps support this partnership, rather than the teams individually."

    Fortnite and PUBG cheating

    By ConocthEU,
    I downloaded Fortnite to see what its like and yea it looks fun and its free atm. But I decided to google what was going on regarding cheating in the game. Any hope that Fortnite might offer a better anti-cheating environment then PUBG is a pipe dream I am afraid. In fact, as it is free to use what bans are handed out are short lived. Cheaters simply make a new account. Personally, I have nerve played a completive shooter that did not have cheats in the game. You can pull your hair out (I can’t as I don’t have any) but as things stand gaming and cheating are not parting ways anytime soon. 
    Perhaps when developers start on a project with anti-cheating as the first value they put in place and not the last or even worse an after the fact one, we might see some progress. Of course, you cant separate the advent of loot boxes and the advent of trading items and the rise of cheating, its all connected. You say with some justification that microtransactions are the root of all evil in the gaming world but we and the developers have no wish to admit this because they want the money and we think we want the crap in the box.
    As long as players keep buying their games and engaging in this microtransaction market, cheating will only grow.  In some games, you can rent and run your own servers but unless you have a staff of in-game watchdogs it doesn’t stop cheating. In that environment, you kick a cheater and they only move on to another server.  Just pick your favourite game and google how to hack it and there is no end to what is out there to help you do just that.  But why oh why do we complain and act as if we are victims?
    In any other sales arena, we have learned that “buyer beware” puts the responsibility on the person buying to he happy that the product is what it says it is.  Do we look at how cheating is going to handled and stopped in the new games we buy? No. Do we boycott games that have no plans to combat cheating on the box? NO.  Do we stop ourselves from buying into the hype and prelaunch sales push that never has a word to say about cheating in it? No.  So why the f**k do we cry and bitch about the developers f**king us when we keep bending over willingly with our jocks around our ankles.
    The only way this will ever change is if the customers stop buying games that have no upfront plan around combatting cheaters. Could you imagine if this was, say, credit cards, and that every time someone got their card or card details stolen and used, the bank would say "too bad m8 it's all your loss and we want the interest too?"  Well, cheating in games is just as mad atm and we the consumer are just giving our money away for crap that is flawed at the deepest level. If it is missing at its core a way to stop cheating it's not a finished game for the market today and should not be sold without a large warning on it.  "This game is open to cheating but believe us we will fix that, maybe."  If you saw that in a game would you buy it?  Yes, because like me you are a dumb ass.

  • Who's Online   0 Members, 0 Anonymous, 2 Guests (See full list)

    There are no registered users currently online